Skip to main content

going it alone

Callie’s latest headline posting on T-Central got me thinking.

The precarious fusion between the different factions of LGBT community may seem, at first glance, to be a convenient marriage but it isn’t really. The most glaring aspect is of course that the first three letters of that acronym deal with sexual orientation while the last one deals exclusively with gender identity; which is a pivotally important difference.

I do understand historically why the union exists however.

The stonewall riots of the 1960’s were led, in part, by transgendered people and in the common fight for inclusion and recognition of a discriminated minority there seemed to be a convergence of purpose there.

Things are different today.

Gays and lesbians have attained a greater degree of recognition and legal protection and are less visually offensive to the public. After all, you can’t pick out a gay person in a crowd; they don’t necessarily dress or look differently than everyone else. The same cannot always be said of the transgendered person.

We have a different battle for recognition.

One of the problems for the transgender community has been its lack of unity and it’s been far too busy infighting and trying to play the game of one-upmanship. Transsexuals look down on the transgender and she males who look down on the crossdresser.

It’s a shame really because much of this is not about labels but about the general concept of gender dysphoria.

Newly transitioned women wanted to go stealth and disown their past. They just wanted to live their lives as normal women and you couldn’t blame them.

Crossdressers were busy hiding from society’s stares and even from their own families. They also could not be blamed.

Ostensibly however, everyone was running away.

Transitioned women like Janet Mock and Laverne Cox are starting to change that and they are embracing the umbrella that unites us. They understand that what relates us all is the incongruity that resides in our brains and makes us question our gender identity. Whether you transition or not is irrelevant; the very fact that you have spent any significant amount of your life questioning your gender identity or do not fit into the binary should be enough.

I agree with them.

So while the gay and lesbian communities do not ponder this hierarchy of legitimacy, the transgendered community has been mired in mudslinging as to who has a greater claim to a truer identity.

Well I am not a woman but I consider myself transgendered and that very fact unites many if not most of us.

It is probably time to unhitch the wagons and go on our own journey for public acceptance and legitimacy. I think the time may have come.


Comments

  1. Well said! Your point, hopefully, will not be glossed over or dismissed or discounted then down-played.

    ReplyDelete
  2. We are all individual people and we are entitled to individual respect and dignity. When speaking of those who are outside or even questioning the gender binary the concept of "one size fits all" is as much of a misnomer as when the phase is applied to pantyhose.
    Good post.
    Pat

    ReplyDelete
  3. I don't have a problem with transgendered being part of the LGBT. We're all a sexually discriminated minority and there is added safety and support that we can supply each other. Until you get to yourself every relationship you have is some sort of umbrella. Aren't the L, G, B and T just smaller umbrellas underneath LGBT. Doesn't the T break into it's own smaller umbrella groups? We can always pick and chose which ones we personally want to support or reject.

    ReplyDelete
  4. We don't really have the same fight Lindsay. Sexual orientation is more a private issue which does not affect workplace visibility for example. Transgender people experience much more bias and discrimination because they stand out much more and present more of a challenge to people's level of acceptance. We are combining apples with oranges really

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think we're going through the same things the LG's went through 20 to 30 years ago. We can learn a lot from their experiences. I think we have a lot more in common with them than with cis-heterosexuals. There are a lot of parallels with what we are experiencing now with what they experienced back then.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

"Oh please its 2016!"

I have mentioned before that I have a lovely young couple living above the unit next to mine. Well the other day as I was getting in the door, she and I overlapped for the first time with me dressed as a woman.

We had a nice conversation and at some point I mentioned the obvious which was that I had told her future husband that they might see me in a different guise from time to time so they wouldn't wonder about who the strange woman was. She just looked at me almost rolling her eyes while smiling from ear to ear and said:

"Oh Please it's 2016!"

For the record she was also very complementary regarding my choice of attire.

I could care less at this point in my life what people think but it is still lovely to see the millennial generation's freedom of spirit and acceptance so lacking in previous generations. Yes they have their own foibles, as does every generation, but this area certainly isn't one of them.

the pseudoscience behind gender dysphoria

The real science as to what causes gender dysphoria still awaits.

Harry Benjamin was on to something except he didn’t have the scientific evidence to back up his suspicions hence, like a true scientist, he negated to draw conclusions. His hunch, based on treating so many patients over his lifetime, was that one is born with a predisposition to be gender dysphoric.

However, with inconclusive brain scans and no DNA marker (as of yet) we are left with believing the word of people who need help and only want to lead happy and productive lives.

The best we have been able to muster since Benjamin's death in 1986 was to amass statistics on who gets a boner imagining themselves as a woman which is in equal parts pathetic and disappointing. For this is not really science at all but is instead playing with interview data that doesn't point to anything definitive or conclusive. I have dealt with this problem at great length in my blog.

The whole thing started with Kurt Freund's obses…

looking past cross gender arousal

Jack’s latest Crossdreamers post got me thinking about cross gender arousal and how it could be avoided; also whether it even matters. This with particular focus on the inability to relate of someone on the outside looking in.

You see, sexuality is a very complicated thing to begin with and when you then add gender identity ambiguity it becomes a recipe to really confuse someone.

So imagine that you are a little boy who identifies as a girl but then along comes puberty and short circuits everything by having the sex you identify with also be the sex you are attracted to. For in essence this is what happens to all all male to female gender dysphoric trans persons who are attracted to women.

So I ask myself: can I imagine a scenario where this inherent contradiction would not produce sexual confusion? The answer is that I cannot.

I am in the unique position, like many of you, to have experienced an early identification with the feminine become sexualized later on. This brought confusion…