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dysphoria treatment according to WPATH

The following is an excerpt from the most recent edition of the WPATH Standards of Care for Transsexual, Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming people. Of particular interest to some of you will be the approved methods to treat dysphoric individuals:

"Advancements in the Knowledge and Treatment of Gender Dysphoria

In the second half of the 20th century, awareness of the phenomenon of gender dysphoria increased when health professionals began to provide assistance to alleviate gender dysphoria by supporting changes in primary and secondary sex characteristics through hormone therapy and surgery, along with a change in gender role. Although Harry Benjamin already acknowledged a spectrum of gender nonconformity (Benjamin, 1966), the initial clinical approach largely focused on identifying who was an appropriate candidate for sex reassignment to facilitate a physical change from male to female or female to male as completely as possible (e.g., Green & Fleming, 1990; Hastings, 1974). This approach was extensively evaluated and proved to be highly effective. Satisfaction rates across studies ranged from 87% of M-t-F patients to 97% of F-t-M patients (Green & Fleming,1990), and regrets were extremely rare (1-1.5% of MtF patients and <1% of FtM patients; Pfäffin,1993). Indeed, hormone therapy and surgery have been found to be medically necessary to alleviate gender dysphoria in many people (American Medical Association, 2008; Anton, 2009; The World Professional Association for Transgender Health, 2008).

As the field matured, health professionals recognized that while many individuals need both hormone therapy and surgery to alleviate their gender dysphoria, others need only one of these treatment options and some need neither (Bockting & Goldberg, 2006; Bockting, 2008; Lev, 2004). Often with the help of psychotherapy, some individuals integrate their trans- or cross-gender feelings into the gender role they were assigned at birth and do not feel the need to feminize or masculinize their body. For others, changes in gender role and expression are sufficient to alleviate gender dysphoria. Some patients may need hormones, a possible change in gender role, but not surgery; others may need a change in gender role along with surgery, but not hormones. In other words, treatment for gender dysphoria has become more individualized.

As a generation of transsexual, transgender, and gender nonconforming individuals has come of age – many of whom have beneftted from different therapeutic approaches – they have become more visible as a community and demonstrated considerable diversity in their gender identities, roles, and expressions. Some individuals describe themselves not as gender nonconforming but as unambiguously cross-sexed (i.e., as a member of the other sex; Bockting, 2008). Other individuals affirm their unique gender identity and no longer consider themselves either male or female (Bornstein, 1994; Kimberly, 1997; Stone, 1991; Warren, 1993). Instead, they may describe their gender identity in specifc terms such as transgender, bigender, or genderqueer, affrming their unique experience that may transcend a male/female binary understanding of gender (Bockting, 2008; Ekins & King, 2006; Nestle, Wilchins, & Howell, 2002). They may not experience their process of identity affrmation as a “transition,” because they never fully embraced the gender role they were assigned at birth or because they actualize their gender identity, role, and expression in a way that does not involve a change from one gender role to another. For example, some youth identifying as genderqueer have always experienced their gender identity and role as such (genderqueer). Greater public visibility and awareness of gender diversity (Feinberg, 1996) has further expanded options for people with gender dysphoria to actualize an identity and fnd a gender role and expression that is comfortable for them.

Health professionals can assist gender dysphoric individuals with affrming their gender identity, exploring different options for expression of that identity, and making decisions about medical treatment options for alleviating gender dysphoria.

Options for Psychological and Medical Treatment of Gender Dysphoria

For individuals seeking care for gender dysphoria, a variety of therapeutic options can be considered. The number and type of interventions applied and the order in which these take place may differ from person to person (e.g., Bockting, Knudson, & Goldberg, 2006; Bolin, 1994; Rachlin, 1999; Rachlin, Green, & Lombardi, 2008; Rachlin, Hansbury, & Pardo, 2010). Treatments options include the following:

• Changes in gender expression and role (which may involve living part time or full time in another gender role, consistent with one’s gender identity);

• Hormone therapy to feminize or masculinize the body;

• Surgery to change primary and/or secondary sex characteristics (e.g., breasts/chest, external and/or internal genitalia, facial features, body contouring);

• Psychotherapy (individual, couple, family, or group) for purposes such as exploring gender identity, role, and expression; addressing the negative impact of gender dysphoria and stigma on mental health; alleviating internalized transphobia; enhancing social and peer support; improving body image; or promoting resilience."



Comments

  1. I tried three times to post this comment... however I asked you if you could give me the link of that research. One day we will discover the cause of transexualism and we will avoid the bottom surgery because irreversible...so this is why we must begin to stop SRS and HRT... also because this condition is getting diffused and so we can try to live as third gendered without so many discrimination...

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  2. Hi Mario if you look up WPATH standards on goggle it will send you to a page with a pdf copy of the latest document. Let me know if you don't find it...

    ReplyDelete
  3. I was wrong...I mean, where can I find the link about the ner research done at john hopkins? I know I wrong the post xD however I found the paper in which there are all standard of care, it is interesting what is written in Appendix D: " there is a need for further research on the effects of hormone therapy without surgery, and without the goal of maximum physical feminization or masculinization''. I add, hormone is not water, it is important to understand its role... I wonder no one had yet completely analizate its role...

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