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lack of a common origin makes little sense

According to Ray Blanchard there are two distinct types of male to female transsexuals: one woman loving (gynephilic) and one man loving (androphilic). But if you read his work these archetypes seem to exist like silos in complete isolation.

There seems to be little logic to the theory that one loves their own image as a female while the other wants to attract heterosexual partners. This is most especially true since both types can trace their gender incongruity to well before puberty thereby removing exclusively sexual motives from the equation. Blanchard avoids trying to explain female to male transsexualism because by this stage even he has confused himself as well as us.

But what if there were a biological root cause for the desire to be female which was simply passed through the filter of sexual orientation?

In the absence of gender dysphoria one type would be an effeminate boy who would grow up to be a homosexual while the other would grow up to be a heterosexual male.

Now add gender dysphoria to the mix and the first type has a perfect alignment by puberty: they are attracted to other boys, are effeminate and are deeply dysphoric. This type of person becomes the typical early transitioner with notable examples being: Tula, Andreja Pejic, April Ashley and Christine Jorgensen among many others.

The second type reaches puberty and recognizes a problem: their orientation and gender dysphoria are in misalignment therefore they will suppress as much as they can their true feelings. This was especially true in our mid-20th century world where gender roles were exceedingly rigid. Notable examples of this group include Lili Elbe, Roberta Cowell, Jan Morris, Katherine Cummings, Renee Richards and Virginia Prince.

During that period of our history even androphilic transsexuals had an enormously difficult time in trying to transition and would do so as much as possible in stealth.

We know very little about the human brain and even less about the origins of transsexualism but if its origins lie in the incorrect administration of androgens (to name one possibility) then we have a potential root cause of a condition that leads people with extreme gender dysphoria to the same place via different routes.

One thing you will note is that as our gender roles have been relaxed in the 21st century we are seeing gynephilic transsexuals transition much earlier than they used to. This is a sign that much of their hesitance was previously rooted in societal disapproval in addition to their own attempts at curing themselves of their contradiction.

If we also agree that dysphoria can be graded then we can have people who exist between genders but can resist undergoing any body modifications. This would include people who call themselves gender fluid, androgynous, gender queer, crossdressers and yes even drag queens who resist calling themselves transgender and yet many of whom clearly show signs of gender behavior which falls well outside the norm even off stage.




Comments

  1. It makes no sense to you, because you don't want it to! Trust me, as someone born with sex dysphoria, there's nothing in the transgender narrative that is pertinent to us. We start from a different place and we wind up in a different place... in fact, the only reason we're part of "the umbrella " is the cowardice of "the community," hiding behind our skirts lest the truth come out that you are in fact, not transsexual!
    And frankly, its high time for it to end! I'm all for the breakingdown of gender roles, but not at the continued expense of those women and men actually born transsexual!

    ReplyDelete
  2. It makes no sense to you, because you don't want it to! Trust me, as someone born with sex dysphoria, there's nothing in the transgender narrative that is pertinent to us. We start from a different place and we wind up in a different place... in fact, the only reason we're part of "the umbrella " is the cowardice of "the community," hiding behind our skirts lest the truth come out that you are in fact, not transsexual!
    And frankly, its high time for it to end! I'm all for the breakingdown of gender roles, but not at the continued expense of those women and men actually born transsexual!

    ReplyDelete
  3. no one is pointing a finger at you or criticizing you if anything this post is supportive but if you think you can call yourself legitimate and everyone else illegitimate then you are barking up the wrong tree. There is almost no science involved here so everyone has their own narrative. The old line of true transsexual versus pretender argument is long past its expiration date.

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's not about being legitimate or not, its about two entirely different things being forced into one that's the issue!
    Transsexual, transgender... they ARE different, and when its treated the same, both loose!
    For example, take a gender variant kid, born male... we used to call them pink boys... they may love sparkly, and pink, and playing with dolls. They may love girls clothing, but the reality is, this kid is most likely going to be a gay male as an adult... leading or letting this kid be lead down the path of transition isn't right! He needs to have the space and support to be different, but still male.
    On the other hand, if you were to try that approach with a young transsexual girl, who's one and only need is to have a body that matches her internal sense of being... you are going to have a deeply damaged if not suicidal kid on your hands!
    One size fits all is wrong, and its almost entirely driven by patriarchal shame! There is no earthy reason that gender express should be limited... but that said, gender expression isn't a sex change...
    That's why its so effing infuriating! Gender gender gender... gender had little to do with me. My issue was an incongruous body, something that I fixed decades back so I could get on with the business of living! I've had two husbands, and countless boyfriends... and these days, my life is not much different than my GFs, none of whom know about my past, and they never will, because, it's not relevant!
    Do I Think "Trans*" is Illegitimate? Nope! I just want to see it stand upon its own feet. I want there to be relevant conversations based on the actual needs of bith transsexual and transgender, and not on this overarching desire to hide from patriarchal shame!

    ReplyDelete
  5. It's not about being legitimate or not, its about two entirely different things being forced into one that's the issue!
    Transsexual, transgender... they ARE different, and when its treated the same, both loose!
    For example, take a gender variant kid, born male... we used to call them pink boys... they may love sparkly, and pink, and playing with dolls. They may love girls clothing, but the reality is, this kid is most likely going to be a gay male as an adult... leading or letting this kid be lead down the path of transition isn't right! He needs to have the space and support to be different, but still male.
    On the other hand, if you were to try that approach with a young transsexual girl, who's one and only need is to have a body that matches her internal sense of being... you are going to have a deeply damaged if not suicidal kid on your hands!
    One size fits all is wrong, and its almost entirely driven by patriarchal shame! There is no earthy reason that gender express should be limited... but that said, gender expression isn't a sex change...
    That's why its so effing infuriating! Gender gender gender... gender had little to do with me. My issue was an incongruous body, something that I fixed decades back so I could get on with the business of living! I've had two husbands, and countless boyfriends... and these days, my life is not much different than my GFs, none of whom know about my past, and they never will, because, it's not relevant!
    Do I Think "Trans*" is Illegitimate? Nope! I just want to see it stand upon its own feet. I want there to be relevant conversations based on the actual needs of bith transsexual and transgender, and not on this overarching desire to hide from patriarchal shame!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I don't disagree with you. My aim is trying to tell all people whether transsexual or transgender that they are who they are and should be proud of themselves. There is no shame in being either and they were born that way.

    ReplyDelete
  7. So what does it take to as MLK put it...to let my people go? Serious question!
    I don't want to throw anyone under the bus, but ever since Virginia Prince coined transgender, my life has gotten harder, not easier!
    And it's simply because these two very different things have been conflated as "the same!" (And for the record, VP told me that was the exact reason he coined the term!)
    As for proud... again, two different things... there's nothing really for me to be proud of in having survived transsexuallity. Anymore than there's "pride" in my having had hip replacement... there was an issue, I fixed it, and I moved on... as have my surviving sisters and brothers... mind you there's no shame either... again, its just different!
    Btw, thank you for letting me comment. It seems all dialogue has been shut off these days unless it echos the party line, and thats a pity... I really and truly believe that gender hinders us as humans, but the way that most activists are going about this is actually enforcing constraints rather than erasing them.

    ReplyDelete
  8. We do in fact constrain ourselves. We should be able to express gender as we like and this blog is on the record many times as saying that undergoing gender reassignment us for thise who really need it. Those of us who blur gender lines are also the way we are. We were born this way with maybe a little help from socialization.

    ReplyDelete

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