Thursday, 29 September 2016

the overlap of sex and gender

Both genders are aware of which physical characteristics promote and exhibit their sexuality. Hence women know their breasts, buttocks or legs have sexual power as men also know that features such as their musculature or height can also promote their sense of being desirable. Both sexes also know an attractive face has much to do with this and hence will do what they can to accentuate the features that nature has given them.

But if you ask women why they might dress in a more sexually suggestive fashion they will tell you it’s more about making other women jealous than trying to attract men. They might also do it to attract one particular partner which makes a lot of sense because most of us are not trying to gain the attention of the general public.

Both sexes also understand how to promote their sexuality via more psychological aspects such as behavior, breeding, mannerisms and education.

Sexuality is about finding and pleasing a partner but also about pleasing oneself through self-identity and power. People can feel more sexually attractive in certain forms of clothing. Hence women understand the power of high heels or a fitted skirt and men know that certain suits or a more fitted T-shirt can bring certain traits to the forefront.

Many transgender people have attempted over their lives to be attractive in both gender roles. Their dysphoria has seen them go from investing energy into fitting into their birth sex and perhaps later making a permanent or part time change to be seen as acceptable as the opposite gender.

Part of that achievement has involved adopting dress or behavior that is generally deemed to be sexually attractive to others. My point here being that sexuality cannot be entirely unbound from gender identity because, without entirely defining it, it forms part of its basic structure.

As I have aged, the sexual energy is being depleted but the identification continues unaffected. So in a sense I am coming full circle where I am starting to resemble how I felt as a young child when the pull towards being the other gender was at its purest.


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