crossdressing is a verb

Crossdressing is a verb and not a noun.

Here are some scenarios:

- A male enjoys dressing at home several times a month

- A male bodied person lives as a woman full time except for work

- A young teen dresses regularly and several years later fully transitions.

- A gay male enjoys dressing on a regular basis and goes to bars and parties that way

- A male enjoys dressing up as a sexy woman in lingerie and sky high heels and ends up mastubating.

Technically these people were all crossdressing but which one would you identify as the archetypal crossdresser? You tell me because I don't know exactly what that means. The motivations of all of these people were clearly a little different. Some dressed for identity; some dressed for psychological comfort; some dressed for erotic pleasure. Could that status change in the future? Yes quite possibly.

I mention all this because I still find some transgendered people getting caught up in definitions like it's some sort of hierarchical scale.

What your crossdressing stands for and means to you is often very personal and very unique. Therefore comparing two different people who crossdress can be like comparing apples and oranges; which is why I stick to using crossdressing as a verb.

The act of crossgender expression can mean drastically different things to different people and can also morph over time to mean something else. It's a pivotal part of who I am but does not define me entirely.

What does it mean for you?

What does your crossdressing signify?

Comments

  1. I think that I share your frustration, and the frustration that has been vented by many in the community with labels. I suppose I can be labeled a crossdresser, or for that matter a driver or golfer or skier or eater or walker or whatever...all nouns that fit a segment of who I am but I think things work better using active verbs,
    I crossdress
    I dress,
    I drive,
    I golf,
    I ski,
    I eat,
    I etc.

    Pat

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