why I identify as a gender dysphoric

Recently I was taken to task for using the term gender dysphoric. Why don't I just say that I feel like a woman and leave it at that? I will explain.

The term gender dysphoria is the officially accepted term for those who feel some level of discomfort with their biological sex and are drawn to the idea of being the opposite sex. This includes full blown transsexualism but also includes less severe cases where other methods may be employed to soothe the feelings. The WPATH standards of care cover some of these other methods in detail. You can also find this information on Anne Vitale's website among others.

If you are still biologically male and have always experienced these feelings then you are gender dysphoric. I don't wade into using the term woman because, as I have shown here in the past, there are people who transition and then detransition which opens another can of worms.

For me, once you have successfully transitioned, you should be addressed as a female and I have never stated anything to the contrary here in this blog. However, this topic is highly complex and I strive to stay on the scientific side of things when discussing it.

I also make the distinction between those who enjoy cross dressing for its own sake but are not dysphoric. They don't need to crossdress but they enjoy it and can exert a relatively good level of control over it. Sometimes this control breaks down and they develop addiction which they themselves often identify. These dressers will typically begin at puberty and be driven mostly by erotic impulses.

What has been happening to me is that as I age I am going back to where I started; namely that my cross gender expression is being mostly driven by feelings of identity. There are no erections to speak of while dressed and I am experiencing peace and comfort. However, my dysphoria can be tempered with cross gender expression that extends beyond the boundaries of most crossdressers. I have found a formula that works.

As long as I remain male bodied, I will continue to refer to myself and others like me as gender dysphoric males.



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